Author Topic: Modle 16 Side Lever Crack Shot  (Read 1592 times)

Offline scooby

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Modle 16 Side Lever Crack Shot
« on: February 14, 2016, 07:14:11 PM »
A buddy shows up at the house earlier this week with this little shooter. Got it for next to nothing due to the condition. He says "Here, give this one a face lift and then give it a good home. I know you will prevent it from ending up in the scap pile."

It was a mess upon first glance. I had just finished refurbishing a neglected 1894 Winchester rifle for him and was not in the mood to do another project such as this. Well, he was not going to take it back home, so it was firm that the little rifle was now mine. I tossed it in the corner and then gave it a good look over a couple of days later . Ya, I guessed I could make it presentable and turn it back into a shooter. I finished it up late Friday night.

To back up a bit, these little modle 16's were made by  J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co. from 1900 to 1913. The cost for one was 3.00 dollars at introduction and went up to 4.00 dollars before they were discontinued. This modle was the only rolling block rim fire that Stevens built. The other Crack Shot and Favorite modles were falling blocks. They are often refered to as "boys rifles" due to their diminutive size and simple construction. The were also made as take downs. I never bothered to find out the total production number of them, but do know that there is an early and late version. This one is the early version. One in good condition can fetch over 500.00 dollars now, but there are not many of them to be had. Most have been beat to hell and have broken extractors and/or missing the side lever.

Anyway, the barrel exterior needed a bunch of attention and the wood looked like cold hammered hound crap, but the frame was good to go and I could see some teeth in the bore. The stock had been broken and repaired with two screws and there was enough dirt in the action to grow a years supply of spuds. As well, someone had a go at attempting to sand the heavy rust from the barrel up near the muzzle and in the process removed all of the origina patina down to shiney metal. They must have got scared and simply quit, or decided that it was not worth it, but the little gun sure looked like hell with a partially sanded barrel.

So here are some pics and text of the end result. I have already located an extractor and will install it when it gets here. I also shot a few rounds of .22 short through her this evening at 15 yards, and know enough now that it is going to shoot OK.

Here is a look at the portion that was sanded by someone.


A look at the rust at the muzzle.


I have the whole barrel taken back here and have blended the previous muzzle sanding job with my work. I purposely left any pitting, but removed all of the raised rust chunks from the surface. I gave the entire surface a final work over with 600 after this photo was taken, and then did some cold bluing work.


And here she lies with a new look. The wood now has a even sheen to it and you can see the grain better now that it had had an ample drink of linseed oil. If you look close, you can see the two wood screws at the middle of the wrist that were used some time back then to repair a cracked stock.


Another full view of the opposite side under a different lighting effect.


Now the frame had some remnants of original case hardening and I did not want to remove any of it, so I conducted some light rehab in a few areas while preserving all of the original patina and color.


You can get an idea just how little these rifles are when you compare the frame size with my hand.


Here is a close up of what the new color looks like on the whole surface of the barrel now. By the way, this is the only stamping on this entire rifle. There is no serial number or no Stevens address and not a single part has an assembly number or letter. My later version has the full Stevens address on the barrel as well as *Crack Shot* in the same location as this one. The late one also has a serial number and the letter m on the lower tang.


The muzzle looks a whole lot better now. There is random pitting left over similar to what you see here on various spots along the barrel too.


These next three shots give you a view of the open rolling block action






And here she sets with my late version modle. The late modle remains in the same condition as when I got it. I have used it a lot over the years to control pests on the property. It shoots real good.


One day I will come across a side lever and cross screw for my late modle. These are neat little relics from a time now long gone when boys roamed the outskirts of their farms with a handfull of rounds in their pockets looking to pop something for the evening dinner pot or to skin out and sell the hide to buy more shells and a bit of hard candy and a soda drink.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2016, 06:44:22 PM by scooby »

Offline Bishop Creek

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Re: Modle 16 Side Lever Crack Shot
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2016, 07:25:18 PM »
Nice work Scooby! A friend of mine had one of those when we were kids back in the 1950s. It was fun to shoot.

Offline Ringo

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Re: Modle 16 Side Lever Crack Shot
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2016, 01:29:06 AM »
Excellent ! They both look good, and it would be hard to tell which was the sick one, had you not told us.
I expect you take as much fun and pleasure curing the gun as shooting it, don't you ?
« Last Edit: February 15, 2016, 05:18:27 AM by Ringo »

Offline mike116

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Re: Modle 16 Side Lever Crack Shot
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2016, 05:02:43 AM »
Nice rehab job Scooby.   I like the quirky old models like these.   I have run across maybe 2 or three of these in the past at gun shows.  I'll keep an eye out for a screw and lever for one.   There are quite a few sellers of parts for old guns at the Denver and Loveland gun shows.  It'll give me a reason to keep going to the shows.

Offline Mad Dog Stafford

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Re: Modle 16 Side Lever Crack Shot
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2016, 05:12:07 AM »
Scooby, Great job on that!  L@.

Offline sltm1

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Re: Modle 16 Side Lever Crack Shot
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2016, 08:27:22 AM »
Excellent work and hat's off for conserving another little bit of history!!!

Offline Captainkirk

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Re: Modle 16 Side Lever Crack Shot
« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2016, 10:25:24 AM »
Fantastic job! I have a break action "Boy Rifle" as well...I will try to post some pix in the next week or so.
Ya done good!
"You gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"

Offline Mad Dog Stafford

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Re: Modle 16 Side Lever Crack Shot
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2016, 11:37:16 AM »
Scooby, is this rifle a .22short or a .22lr?

Also, that barrel looks nice and thick at the end.

Offline sourdough

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Re: Modle 16 Side Lever Crack Shot
« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2016, 03:03:03 PM »
Very nice pair of rifles, Scooby! According to Flayderman, the Model 16 was made in .22 and .32 rimfire from 1900-1913. The older one appears to have a steel buttplate, the newer one having a plastic/bakelite/composite buttplate. Flayderman also makes reference a similar model discontinued in 1890, although I have not located a photo of that one. The takedown screw has the "saddle" ring on the screw, just as Flayderman portrays it.

I have always admired the shape of the wood (stock and fore-end) as well as the buttplates on those old Stevens rifles, even the more plain ones. Stevens also marketed much fancier rifles for those who could afford it.

I have always been intrigued by older (pre-WWII) rifles and pistols produced by Stevens. The following link shows a Model 16 with a slotted screw securing the thumb lever where yours shows a blind screw.

The Model 16 here shows a knurled thumbscrew with no ring. The link also shows a lot of other hardware to drool over:

http://milpas.cc/rifles/ZFiles/Manufacturers/Stevens/Stevens%20Arms%20Co.html

Congrats on owning two nice pieces of history.

Jim
« Last Edit: February 15, 2016, 03:05:52 PM by sourdough »

Offline scooby

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Re: Modle 16 Side Lever Crack Shot
« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2016, 04:23:45 PM »
Scooby, is this rifle a .22short or a .22lr?

Also, that barrel looks nice and thick at the end.

Hi Sam, she is a 22 long. Won't accept a 22 long rifle.

Offline scooby

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Re: Modle 16 Side Lever Crack Shot
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2016, 04:34:55 PM »
Thanks Jim for the link.

Indeed, the older version does have a steel buttplate and the newer one a bakelite. The older one also did not have the extruded stud and ring integral with the take down screw. Rather it is just a surface mounted screw head.

From the pic shown in the link, it looks to me that the ring is missing from the take down screw stud.