Author Topic: modifies Lee bullets.  (Read 182 times)

Offline Don

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modifies Lee bullets.
« on: September 30, 2017, 01:41:34 PM »
I have cast 130 grain .36 cal., 220 grain .44 cal. and 200 grain .44 cal. bullets. Recently I got into shooting my brass frame revolvers and wondered how lighter conicals would perform. So I cut off the bottom band on these bullets and tried them. Except for the 200 grain bullets they shot great with excellent accuracy even better than round balls. The 200 grain bullets shot well but the others were much more accurate. Have any of you guys tried this and did you have similar results?

Don

Offline Hawg

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Re: modifies Lee bullets.
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2017, 02:04:04 PM »
Be warned the conicals create a lot more thrust against the recoil shield. I wouldn't shoot them out of a brass frame.

Offline G Dog

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Re: modifies Lee bullets.
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2017, 07:44:14 PM »
For my only brasser (Pietta Griswold .36 - the first one, almost six months now) the loads are kept low at 16/17 grains and at that level of charge a heavier conical never seemed justified.  A potential squib problem is concerning, too.

So, having never done it, my opinion lacks any basis in background or experience.  Ill stick with round-ball though and conserve Navy size conical for steel frames, especially now in view of Hawgs observation.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2017, 07:46:22 PM by G Dog »

Offline Don

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Re: modifies Lee bullets.
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2017, 05:11:27 AM »
After cutting off the bottom band of the 130 grain bullets average weight is 92 grains. That is only 8 grains more than the round balls. This small increase in weight doesn't concern me in terms of damage to the frame. I carefully inspect the brass frame after shooting and have not seen any damage. When I've shot the 130 grain bullets I reduce the powder charge to 15 grains and no damage was noted afterward. The 220 grain bullets when modified weigh 160 grains on average. I have fired these through a Remington brasser with a reduced powder charge with no evidence of cylinder imprint or stretch to frame.

Don

Offline mazo kid

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Re: modifies Lee bullets.
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2017, 03:28:42 PM »
How did you "cut" the bottom band off the bullet? Did you mill the top of the mold, or actually cut the bullet off? And if so, how?

Offline AntiqueSledMan

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Re: modifies Lee bullets.
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2017, 05:45:20 AM »
I found a post on Cascity and saved for future reference.


Offline Don

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Re: modifies Lee bullets.
« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2017, 05:58:58 PM »
I took an old kitchen knife and put the edge of the blade in the bottom grease groove and rolled the bullet back and forth until I cut through. With soft lead this didn't take long at all. Not a precision process but it works.

Don

Offline mazo kid

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Re: modifies Lee bullets.
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2017, 11:56:27 AM »
Pretty much like I would do it!