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Author Topic: Walker musings.  (Read 606 times)

Offline LonesomePigeon

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Walker musings.
« on: December 25, 2017, 05:45:38 PM »
 Just musing on the original Walker's. There were 1,100 original Walker's. 1,000 went to the military and the other 100 were sold to civilians or presented as gifts. Does anybody know how many were actually sold to civilians vs. how many were given as gifts? How were the ones that were sold to civilians marketed? Were they advertized or simply sold by word of mouth? How many civilian Walker's are known to be in existence today?

Offline Captainkirk

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Re: Walker musings.
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2017, 08:31:30 PM »
Knowing Col. Colt, I would suspect (since the presentation models were frequently given as a braced set) probably less than 50 ended up being sold to John Q. Public. The RL Wilson book specifically mentions 3 braced sets given alone, accounting for 6. In fact, I would speculate probably less than 25 ended up in civilian hands, but that's my opinion and not fact.
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Offline jaxenro

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Re: Walker musings.
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2017, 03:07:13 AM »
Colts gifts would be known as bribes today. Military officers and politicians mostly
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Offline LonesomePigeon

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Re: Walker musings.
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2017, 08:44:38 AM »
No doubt they were bribes, he probably bought them a fancy dinner too, or maybe even put on a ceremonial party. I'm more interested in how many and by what means any may have end up in civilian hands. Some might have gone to potential investors if there were any investors. I found a picture of a cased civilian Walker, said to be the only known surviving cased civilian one. It is #1022 and was sold to a Danish sailor in 1847 and returned to the United States after World War II. Replicas of this case have been put out, I have seen them holding ASM and, I think, Uberti Walker's but I'm not sure who manufactured the case. I think there are a couple versions of these cases that are based on the original.

Offline Krylandalian

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Re: Walker musings.
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2017, 10:14:29 PM »
Here s  where 2 of them went,-

''Permit me to present you with a pair of my Pt. Repeating Pistols embracing the modern improvements.
You though a stranger to me personally I consider an aquaintance. A friend & one having contributed as much or more than aney other individual to test the merrits of my invention.''

Colt to Hays 3 June 1847 (''Before any of the 1000 pistols were delivered to the army, Colt sent the first pair of the 'civilian'  pistols to...'').

Offline Krylandalian

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Re: Walker musings.
« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2017, 10:25:52 PM »
''For several days, Colt remained in New York City. When he arrived there on or about the 3rd of June, he had with him an unknown quantity of the 100 'Civilian' pistols in addition to the two he shipped to Hays. During his stay in the city, Colt visited several arms dealers and sold or consigned some of the pistols. One in particular,  serial number 1022, with appendages, he sold or consigned to the firm of Blunt & Syms. . . .''

The Colt Whitneyville-Walker Pistol
By Lt. Col. Robert D. Whittington, III