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Author Topic: .32 S&W Long  (Read 419 times)

Offline Dave Shooter

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.32 S&W Long
« on: January 13, 2018, 09:11:44 AM »


I've had this Smith Model 30-1for some time and decided to take it out Thursday.  55° F and the rain stopped how could I not?  (We're back in the deep freeze now.)

Factory LRN hadn't seemed terribly accurate when I first got it.  Tried loading some plated hollow base wadcutters.  It didn't seem like they were all that great either, and they shot low.  Began search for reasonable accuracy load that shot to the sights, might be a useful bunny gun or for the kids.

Turns out a .314 pin gauge will go into all six cylinder throats and a .315 will not, so I ordered some 100 grain cast wadcutters from Penn sized .314.  He offers a softer alloy upon request, although he tried to convince me to go with the standard "hard cast" alloy.  Can't see the advantage for revolver use at well under 1000 fps.

Being a solid framed gun with a reputation as being quite a bit stronger than the old top breaks I was a bit bolder with Bullseye for first cast bullet load than I might have been.

It was solid overcast and the last hour of daylight when I got out, not the best shooting conditions.  I had problems consistently seeing front sight but was pleased with results nonetheless.  First group, on left, was the plated HBWCs.  Still shot low but maybe I was wrong about this not being a good bullet for this gun .  Four rounds that would fit on a squirrels head at 25 yards?!  With all six in under two inches.  Next, as it was getting even darker, were the 100 gr .314ers on right.  A bit over two inches and just above POA; we may be on to something.  The cast load chrono'd a few rounds around 850 fps, a pleasant pop.  The plated hollow base loads ran ~650 fps and were silly low recoil.  I believe a .22 kicks more.  Even with low POI these would still be useful for introducing a youngster to revolvers.

I've got several grips besides the factory ones that fit a J-frame roundbutt.  Gonna see how those affect point of impact.

Oh yeah, since I was on a .32 kick, when I saw the post about Wells Fargo on sale my brain somehow said "you should get one".  😁
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Offline ssb73q

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Re: .32 S&W Long
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2018, 09:46:36 AM »
Hi Dave, since you will be the owner of a new 1849 Wells Fargo you may want to consider a conversion cylinder in .32 Short. I recommend Taylors:
http://www.taylorsfirearms.com/hand-guns/cartridge-conversions/1849-pocket-conversion-cylinders.html

.32 S&W short can sometimes be hard to find, but you can trim .32 Long cases to the correct length.

Regards,
Richard
There’s nothing better in the morning than the smell of bacon and black powder smoke!

Offline Dave Shooter

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Re: .32 S&W Long
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2018, 10:06:11 AM »
.32 ACP brass should work for light .32 S&W loads also, right?  Haven't tried it but the semi rim should allow headspace.  I've shot factory .38 Super ammo in a .357 Mag revolver before with no ill effect.  I've got some .32 ACP cases from my Seecamp, might give those a try.
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Offline Dave Shooter

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Re: .32 S&W Long
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2018, 01:37:47 PM »
Here are the two 4" .32s.  Very similar in size.



Interesting trivia:
The Smith is 50 years older than the Colt copy.
Smith as shown is also a smidge under two ounces lighter.
Happily Retired USAF ossifer
Engineer?
Shooter of questionable skill...
Unabashed patriot!