Author Topic: My Remington Zouave  (Read 6855 times)

Offline Captainkirk

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Re: My Remington Zouave
« Reply #30 on: March 14, 2014, 09:11:26 PM »
Yes, it does look original.

Ummm not really, that's a trapdoor action.

I meant the finish..... :P
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Offline StrawHat

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Re: My Remington Zouave
« Reply #31 on: March 15, 2014, 11:59:06 AM »
... I'd really rather have an 1841 ...  That and the zouave are probably the handsomest martial longarms designed IMHO...

Really, to my eyes, that distinction is held by the 1803 Harper's Ferry.

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Offline Pat/Rick

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Re: My Remington Zouave
« Reply #32 on: March 15, 2014, 12:36:47 PM »
Either way ya explain it, yep.

The 1803 is a good looking gun no doubt, as is a Ferguson. I suppose I could have quantified my statement with "of the percussion guns".  But then, I also said, "Basically, it's the age old problem of too many desires and not enough funding LOL! Forget world peace, I need to figure out how to fix that problem"

Kinda the same thing as having too long of a list (like one of each, uh-huh.)

 In 2006, during the L&C celebrations, I talked to one of the historians and asked him about the "question" on which arm the L&C expedition armed themselves with. I asked him why do some say that they carried the 1803, when their journal's state that they carried an arm whose ball's weighed 100 to the pound (.36). He basically told me that it depended on who you talk to, and historians are still in disagrement about it. I thought it was interesting enough and am still trying to find the answer. Also in their journal they explained that while surveying the Louisiana purchase the guns of .54 caliber, were somewhat of a detriment in the ability to carry enough munitions for an extended expedition. I suppose until a better answer is obtained, the 1803 HF is as good a stand in as any.

 

Offline Tom-ADC

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Re: My Remington Zouave
« Reply #33 on: March 15, 2014, 01:00:21 PM »
Mississippi on sale, still not cheap but its a grand looking rifle..

http://www.cabelas.com/product/Shooting/Black-Powder/Traditional-Rifles-Shotguns|/pc/104792580/c/104701680/sc/104641380/Pedersoli-Mississippi-58-Caliber-Rifle/1223639.uts?destination=%2Fcatalog%2Fbrowse%2Ftraditional-rifles-shotguns%2F_%2FN-1100202%2FNs-CATEGORY_SEQ_104641380%3FWTz_l%3DSBC%253BMMcat104792580%253Bcat104701680&WTz_l=SBC%3BMMcat104792580%3Bcat104701680%3Bcat104641380

Offline StrawHat

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Re: My Remington Zouave
« Reply #34 on: March 15, 2014, 07:50:57 PM »
Lot's of arguments for/against the HF 1803 as the rifle of the Lewis and Clark Exposition.  I like it because it is a good looking rifle.  Mine is ne of the early 58 caliber imports.  My Uncle had one, an original, converted to percussion and bored out smooth.  I want to get it and have Bob Hoyt line it.  I can handle the reconversion to flint.  Anyway, the 1803 is a thread drfit, best handled in a seperate thread.
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