photo Dragoon-Navyset_zps3txqpebh.jpg

Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
Navy Models / Re: Engraved 1851 sale
« Last post by ssb73q on Today at 07:52:55 AM »
Hi, dovetailing the front sight of the engraved Pietta .44 1851 went so easy, it got me thinking about doing the same for another Pietta .44 1851 I own. Slam bam thank you mam, it's done, see:



The engraved 1851 is on top.

Now I can accurately shoot .45 Colt from each of these revolvers. And yes, I have two Howell 1860 .45 Colt conversion cylinders.

Regards,
Richard

Hi, the Pietta Engraved .44 1851 was taken out back and sighted in @25yds for using the.45 Colt conversion cylinder. The sight needed to be filed down to have poi=poa. Accuracy with this .44 1851 is excellent. This is the revolver with the front sight filed down (compare against the sight as installed above):



I now have only one more Pietta .44 1851 with the taller dovetail front sight that needs to be sighted in, that should occur tomorrow.

Regards,
Richard
2
I have been told (never tried it) that a heat gun on low setting or hair drier willspeed up dry time considerably. I used to heat mine on the stove and apply it warm; it soaks in much more quickly and dries within a day or so as opposed to room temp. Whichever you choose, good luck and remember to post pix!
3
Boiled Linseed oil, has chemicals added no make the coating dry faster.
Boiled actually is not boiled in the sense we think, but rather  drying agents added.
I use a auto glass shop that specializes in vintage Car and Truck glass replacement and installation.
He uses Boiled Linseed as a window glass sealer. He claims aids in installing rubber seal around glass edge.
Then dries to very good weather seal.
4
Very close to the same, Tru Oil has some synthetics that dry much faster than either tung or linseed.
Personally, there is no better looking (or smelling) finish than linseed oil, but it stays tacky for days between coats, and to do it right you need multiple coats that get steel-wooled down after each coat but the final. Superb water resistance and sheen, if time is no object. Tung oil is similar, but dries a little more quickly.
If time is of the essence, try the next best thing and go Tru Oil.
5
I thought Colt used a violin type varnish, oil based, for the nicer civilian guns?
6
Gunsmithing/Tuning/Parts & Repairs / Re: Color stain choices redoing wood grips ?
« Last post by Hewy on February 20, 2017, 07:52:15 PM »
OK Kirk, Tru Oil similar to Tung Oil ?
I just read ingredients in Tru Oil.....Linseed and natural oils.
I have read some article that boiled Linseed oil was used a lot back in the day.
7
Gunsmithing/Tuning/Parts & Repairs / Re: Color stain choices redoing wood grips ?
« Last post by Hewy on February 20, 2017, 07:48:52 PM »
Hawg, I read another post I put up about the finish coating varnish ,laquer etc and you said the same thing,
clean everything off and use Tung Oil.
It is closer to what the old guys in the 1800s would have used.
Your right. I'm going to do that.
8
Gunsmithing/Tuning/Parts & Repairs / Re: Color stain choices redoing wood grips ?
« Last post by Captainkirk on February 20, 2017, 07:46:58 PM »
Personally, I agree with Hawg. I do not like red finish grips.
My favorite wood finish is Tru Oil over black walnut. With lots of burls and striping...
9
Gunsmithing/Tuning/Parts & Repairs / Re: Color stain choices redoing wood grips ?
« Last post by Hawg on February 20, 2017, 07:09:03 PM »
Personally I'd get rid of that red crap and use an oil finish.
10
Gunsmithing/Tuning/Parts & Repairs / Color stain choices redoing wood grips ?
« Last post by Hewy on February 20, 2017, 04:56:49 PM »
I have a Uberti , recent production (  2016 )that has a scratch in the wood. I lightly sanded
that spot and now need to restain the area. Probably will do the whole grip to be an even color.
Ubert uses a red tone stain over what I think is Walnut.
Anyone know what Brand of stain and color will match ?
Or should I just strip the entire grip and start over with a new color.
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10