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Messages - Ringo

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1
General Discussion / Re: Books
« on: August 14, 2017, 01:15:37 AM »
The Story of Colts Revolver,  The Biography of Col. Samuel Colt  by  William B. Edwards  1953.
Thanks to your message, I went out to look for a copy, found one, got it and started reading it. I've only got to page 120 as of yet, but I can tell it is a fascinating read. Thanks for your advice Krylandalian.  ;D

2
Army Models / Re: Unknown 1860
« on: July 02, 2017, 02:20:07 AM »
Glad I can be of assistance to start a conversation.   ;)
Sorry to crash into your thread that way. Thanks for having us. :)

Sounds good to me.  I've never heard of Riva Esterina until now.  What other trade marks did they use?
As far as i know, they also used DART as a trademark, in addition to their own name. So they used at least 3 different trademarks:
- PR for black powder replicas of handguns and long arms,
- DART for side arms such as Python, Black Widow and DObermann,
- Riva Esterina at least for carbines such as the Pony Carbine and the Texas Carbine.

3
Army Models / Re: Unknown 1860
« on: July 01, 2017, 12:40:20 PM »
A couple years ago, I sent an inquiry to the Consorzio Armaioli Italiani asking if they knew who was hiding behind the PR mark, and this is what Ms Monica Cancarini answered:
"PR is a proof mark for RIVA ESTERINA. The company stopped their production at the end of 1979/1980 (more or less)."
This being consistent with what the proofhouse told me, I believe PR to be one of the trade marks Riva Esterina used.

4
Schneider & Glassick / Re: Help identifying gunmaker
« on: May 16, 2017, 03:18:57 PM »
A gun kit such as this model has a barrel, a frame, and a cylinder. It is designed to be assembled and to shoot. So each piece has to be proofed before it goes into the kit. It is just a matter of safety. That's the way we see it in Europe anyway.
Once each piece has been proofed, it bears the proof markings, including the date code. I don't know if this was mandatory back in the 1960s and 1970s, but it is now.

5
Thanks for the answer, Valforgettaboutit.
The problem for me is I can't have access through my local library as I don't live in the U.S.A.
Oh well.... I guess I'll just have to make do without it, as I did before I knew it existed...  )lI

6
(...), while doing research on this guy I also found an old NY Times article on Val first bringing these guys over from Italy, has a great photo of him and a table full of Colts.
Hi Valforgettaboutit, congrats on your buy, you really have got yourself a piece of history. Of course it never saw the Old West, but it is a witness of the very first days of replica making.
Have you still got this article you mention, and could you share a copy?
Cheers.

7
NEW MEMBER CHECK-IN / Re: Happy to be here
« on: April 22, 2017, 01:22:05 AM »
Welcome to the Club!

8
General Discussion / Re: Favorite - now defunct - Importers
« on: March 09, 2017, 06:36:39 AM »
Navy Arms, Replica Arms (El Paso), and EIG.
Navy Arms for the same reasons as LonesomePigeon. Replica Arms (El Paso) because they are scarce. EIG because they imported my well-beloved GLBs.

9
It took me more than a year since I posted here (in fact it took me more than 5 years since I started my search) but I have found another gun bearing the Euromanuarms marking.
The thing is it is not a GLB, and neither is it a replica :

As you can see, it is a side by side shotgun, same kind as I mentioned before, except it is a 16 gauge.
Now for the markings inside the frame :

They show that the gun has been made in 1970 (XXVI) by FIAGG (the maker's mark, although faint, can be seen below the serial number). FIAGG is the acronym standing for Fabbrica Italiana Armi Gnali Graziano, aka Armi Gnali, a rather rather well-known Italian shotguns maker.

The Euromanuarms marking being present on guns made by two different gunsmiths, we can infer that it was not a gunsmith's mark but rather a wholesaler's, probably not more bound to one than to the other. We can add that is was in business at least between 1968 and 1970. Until we find another gun bearing this mark, i'd say this is about all we can claim about it.

10
Schneider & Glassick / Re: Historiclally Accurate S & G's
« on: March 02, 2017, 09:12:42 AM »
I am fully on Sourdough's side on this. ASPs and GLBs are definitely collectible items. ASP was absorbed by Euroarms in the early 2000's. GLB sank without a trace in 1971. That only makes them collectible, as they are witnesses of the early times of italian replica making and the craft that was used to make them. Remember how original black powder Colts were considered until the 1960's.
Every black powder revolvr collection should include at least one of them, ditto for ASMs, Palmettos, GAMIs, Mavis, and so on.

11
J.H. Dance / Re: Dance Revolvers
« on: January 28, 2017, 12:29:36 PM »
(...) My only choice, as I see it, is to buy a Pietta 1851 Navy .36 steel, mill off the recoil shields, color-case the new areas (or full frame), and install the G&G part round/part octagon .36 barrel. (...)
If you go that way, Jim, do not bother to color case the frame. From all the pictures I have seen of original Dance revolvers, it seems quite obvious that the frames were blued, just like the other iron parts.

If you look at the pic that I posted, you will notice that I did in fact remove the case coloring and blued the frame.
and right you were !

12
J.H. Dance / Re: Dance Revolvers
« on: January 27, 2017, 03:19:09 PM »
(...) I hope you had a good dinner using hard-crust French bread tonight! I love it with butter and lots of garlic! (...)
We always have ead on the table for each meal, whether baguette or round loaf. There is nothing that can top a good slice of bread and butter (especially slightly-salted butter). Whenever you come to France, I'll be glad to treat you to as much as you like.

13
J.H. Dance / Re: Dance Revolvers
« on: January 27, 2017, 02:43:51 PM »
(...) My only choice, as I see it, is to buy a Pietta 1851 Navy .36 steel, mill off the recoil shields, color-case the new areas (or full frame), and install the G&G part round/part octagon .36 barrel. (...)
If you go that way, Jim, do not bother to color case the frame. From all the pictures I have seen of original Dance revolvers, it seems quite obvious that the frames were blued, just like the other iron parts.


14
Leech & Rigdon / Rigdon & Ansley / Re: My Leech & Rigdon (ex-1851)
« on: January 19, 2017, 04:03:33 PM »
Thanks for the kind offer, Jim. I do appreciate.
I have taken a look at the site you pointed me too, and they advertise $500 in fees to start, and then additional charges between $200 and over $1.000.
Which means that if I bought a $250 gun, the total I'd have to pay (price + fess & charges) would be at least $1.000.
Moreover, they require an import certificate which is never delivered by any French authority, as buying a black powder replica is free in france when you're over 18.

So now, I know I won't ever be able to buy a gun from any American dealer, and I understand why no dealer wants to take the hassle.

Once again, sincerest thanks, Jim. Should a miracle happen, I would take up tour offer gladly, but miracles don't happen too often in my neck of the woods...

15
Leech & Rigdon / Rigdon & Ansley / Re: My Leech & Rigdon (ex-1851)
« on: January 19, 2017, 02:54:27 PM »
Many thanks, Sourdough. I do appreciate your help.
I will see now whether they can help me.  :)

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