Author Topic: Newly acquired Police model  (Read 10010 times)

Offline Fingers McGee

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 741
  • Show Me Shootout 2014 - TTN Hammer gun & BP
    • View Profile
    • Central Ozarks Western Shooters
Re: Newly acquired Police model
« Reply #15 on: May 09, 2015, 09:21:33 AM »
but I will call the 1862 an 1861 Colt.

Regards,
Richard

Cause that's what it actually is; Pietta marketing not withstanding.
Fingers (Show Me MO smoke) McGee - AKA Man of Many Colts; SASS 28564-L-TG, rangemaster and stage writer extraordinaire; Frontiersman/Pistoleer, NRA Endowment Life, Central Ozarks Western Shooters
Cynic: A blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they should be.  Ambrose Bierce

Offline ssb73q

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2223
  • Gunsmoke junkie
    • View Profile
Re: Newly acquired Police model
« Reply #16 on: May 10, 2015, 04:27:21 AM »
Hi Fingers, after handling a few different models of replica BP handguns, I think that the 5.5" barrel Colt 1861 (Pietta 1862) would make for a very nice cowboy action shooting handgun. The heft and balance seems perfect. Used with conversion cylinders to eliminate cap sucking would have it very reliable.

I'm not into cowboy action stuff, but it's just a thought after handling my new Pietta.

Regards,
Richard
There’s nothing better in the morning than the smell of bacon and black powder smoke!

Offline StrawHat

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1240
    • View Profile
Re: Newly acquired Police model
« Reply #17 on: May 10, 2015, 04:45:53 AM »
...Used with conversion cylinders to eliminate cap sucking would have it very reliable ...
Regards,
Richard...

Richard,

Some of us use C&B Colts and do not experience the problems you mention.  There are several threads about ways to accomplish this.

Kevin
Knowledge carried to the grave unshared, is wasted.

www.NoonSharpening.com

Offline ssb73q

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2223
  • Gunsmoke junkie
    • View Profile
Re: Newly acquired Police model
« Reply #18 on: May 10, 2015, 05:22:26 PM »
Hi, of course, like the other two .36 caliber 1851s, the 38 Colt (38 Special) conversion cylinder wouldn't work in the new Pietta 1862 Police. The bolt pops up before the hammer is back far enough to engage the sear. Shorting the hand ~0.010 and rounding the hand end did the trick. Now both conversion cylinders and cap and ball cylinders work where the timing is perfect. Colt cylinder lead ins allows for a lot of change in hand length. The oiled stock of this Pietta has a very nice figure, but I like a little more shine on a handgun stock. Two coats of tung oil have been put on. Tomorrow I can smooth the finish down with very fine steelwool and then put the finish coat on.

This new revolver still needs to be put on my pistol permit (NY) before I can legally shoot it. I look forward to testing it for accuracy.

Regards,
Richard
There’s nothing better in the morning than the smell of bacon and black powder smoke!

Offline ssb73q

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2223
  • Gunsmoke junkie
    • View Profile
Re: Newly acquired Police model
« Reply #19 on: May 11, 2015, 11:00:02 AM »
Hi, this is the new Pietta .36 caliber 1862 Police on sale from Cabellas. The stock was oiled, but I wanted a finish a bit shiner so it was Tung oiled. The hand was modified so it will be able to use my 38 Colt (38 Special) conversion cylinders. Here is a photo of the Pietta with the Uberti 1862:



Notice how much smaller the frame is on the lower revolver, the Uberti. The Uberti is made to be a replica of the 1862 Colt. The Pietta 1862 Police should really be called an 1861.

Regards,
Richard
There’s nothing better in the morning than the smell of bacon and black powder smoke!

Offline Captainkirk

  • Administrator Extraordinaire and Part-Time Gunslinger
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4018
  • "Nothing like a nice piece of hickory"
    • View Profile
Re: Newly acquired Police model
« Reply #20 on: May 11, 2015, 12:20:53 PM »
Thanks for posting. I can really see the difference in size with that picture.
"You gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"

Offline sourdough

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 333
  • Newbie
    • View Profile
Re: Newly acquired Police model
« Reply #21 on: May 11, 2015, 01:17:57 PM »
Hi, this is the new Pietta .36 caliber 1862 Police on sale from Cabellas. The stock was oiled, but I wanted a finish a bit shiner so it was Tung oiled. The hand was modified so it will be able to use my 38 Colt (38 Special) conversion cylinders. Here is a photo of the Pietta with the Uberti 1862:



Notice how much smaller the frame is on the lower revolver, the Uberti. The Uberti is made to be a replica of the 1862 Colt. The Pietta 1862 Police should really be called an 1861.

Regards,
Richard

The bottom (Uberti) pistol looks a lot like an 1862 Pocket Navy...

Offline sourdough

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 333
  • Newbie
    • View Profile
Re: Newly acquired Police model
« Reply #22 on: May 11, 2015, 03:07:46 PM »
Hi, of course, like the other two .36 caliber 1851s, the 38 Colt (38 Special) conversion cylinder wouldn't work in the new Pietta 1862 Police. The bolt pops up before the hammer is back far enough to engage the sear. Shorting the hand ~0.010 and rounding the hand end did the trick. Now both conversion cylinders and cap and ball cylinders work where the timing is perfect. Colt cylinder lead ins allows for a lot of change in hand length. The oiled stock of this Pietta has a very nice figure, but I like a little more shine on a handgun stock. Two coats of tung oil have been put on. Tomorrow I can smooth the finish down with very fine steelwool and then put the finish coat on.

This new revolver still needs to be put on my pistol permit (NY) before I can legally shoot it. I look forward to testing it for accuracy.

Regards,
Richard

Please explain to this noob how shortening the hand length will allow the cylinder to advance far enough before the bolt aligns with the cylinder slots. I would think the hand would have to be lengthened rather than shortened, unless your Pietta allows the cylinder to over-travel before the bolt engages the cylinder. My Pietta 1851 Navy steel .36 is just the opposite and needs a longer hand.

Thanks!

Jim

« Last Edit: May 11, 2015, 03:28:18 PM by sourdough »

Offline ssb73q

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2223
  • Gunsmoke junkie
    • View Profile
Re: Newly acquired Police model
« Reply #23 on: May 11, 2015, 04:29:30 PM »
Hi Jim, the ratchet on the conversion cylinder allows the conversion cylinder to rotate at a greater angular displacement per hammer angular movement compared to the cap and ball cylinder. With the original hand and the conversion cylinder installed in the revolver the bolt will pop up locking the cylinder, but the hammer isn't back far enough to have the sear engage. The bolt locks the cylinder and prevents any further hammer movement. All my .36 Pietta Colt revolvers (1851s and 1862) were purchased in the last year and have the same 1851 frame (the 1862 is slightly different in that it has the shoulder mounting screws in the frame). Each of these three revolvers had the same issue with my two Howell (Taylor) 38 Colt (38 Special) conversion cylinders. One might think that if that's the case, shorting the hand would then throw the cap and ball cylinders out of time? After shortening the hand, the bolt does pop up a little earlier than before in the cap and ball cylinder bolt slot lead in, but the hammer can be pulled back a little more to get a solid bolt lockup as the sear is engaged. Shortening the hand works with my current manufacture Pietta 1851 frames, but may not be a universal issue for all Pietta 1851s.

Did this make any sense?

Regards,
Richard
There’s nothing better in the morning than the smell of bacon and black powder smoke!

Offline sourdough

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 333
  • Newbie
    • View Profile
Re: Newly acquired Police model
« Reply #24 on: May 12, 2015, 08:25:54 AM »
Hi Jim, the ratchet on the conversion cylinder allows the conversion cylinder to rotate at a greater angular displacement per hammer angular movement compared to the cap and ball cylinder. With the original hand and the conversion cylinder installed in the revolver the bolt will pop up locking the cylinder, but the hammer isn't back far enough to have the sear engage. The bolt locks the cylinder and prevents any further hammer movement. All my .36 Pietta Colt revolvers (1851s and 1862) were purchased in the last year and have the same 1851 frame (the 1862 is slightly different in that it has the shoulder mounting screws in the frame). Each of these three revolvers had the same issue with my two Howell (Taylor) 38 Colt (38 Special) conversion cylinders. One might think that if that's the case, shorting the hand would then throw the cap and ball cylinders out of time? After shortening the hand, the bolt does pop up a little earlier than before in the cap and ball cylinder bolt slot lead in, but the hammer can be pulled back a little more to get a solid bolt lockup as the sear is engaged. Shortening the hand works with my current manufacture Pietta 1851 frames, but may not be a universal issue for all Pietta 1851s.

Did this make any sense?

Regards,
Richard

Yes! Thanks.

Jim

Offline cidcw4

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 16
  • Newbie
    • View Profile
Re: Newly acquired Police model
« Reply #25 on: May 14, 2015, 06:58:16 PM »
Really nice looking pistol.  I really like the Pocket Police guns. 

Co-incidentally today I received my Allen Firearms 4 1/2" barrel Pocket Police in Stainless Steel. It passes the magnet test. The barrel markings are:
"Allen FA MFG Co, Santa Fe NM. The Italian date code is AN which I believe is 1978.  It has a slight cylinder mark and was probably fired more than once, but otherwise it is in great condition.  No box, no paperwork but I really think it is cool.  Once I figure out out to upload pictures I will.  I tried to attach a file so see if it works.

CIDCW4 L@.

Offline mike116

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1675
    • View Profile
    • LeathersmithMike.com
Re: Newly acquired Police model
« Reply #26 on: May 14, 2015, 07:18:41 PM »
Can't wait to see it.

Offline Captainkirk

  • Administrator Extraordinaire and Part-Time Gunslinger
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4018
  • "Nothing like a nice piece of hickory"
    • View Profile
Re: Newly acquired Police model
« Reply #27 on: May 22, 2015, 10:46:32 PM »
Waiting on those pix.... *Z$
"You gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"

Offline cidcw4

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 16
  • Newbie
    • View Profile
Re: Newly acquired Police model
« Reply #28 on: May 23, 2015, 05:29:35 AM »
Still not working, probably me.  I'm going to a gun show in Fredericksburg, VA.  Will try later.

Offline ssb73q

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2223
  • Gunsmoke junkie
    • View Profile
Re: Newly acquired Police model
« Reply #29 on: May 24, 2015, 04:41:30 AM »
Hi, of course, like the other two .36 caliber 1851s, the 38 Colt (38 Special) conversion cylinder wouldn't work in the new Pietta 1862 Police. The bolt pops up before the hammer is back far enough to engage the sear. Shorting the hand ~0.010 and rounding the hand end did the trick. Now both conversion cylinders and cap and ball cylinders work where the timing is perfect. Colt cylinder lead ins allows for a lot of change in hand length. The oiled stock of this Pietta has a very nice figure, but I like a little more shine on a handgun stock. Two coats of tung oil have been put on. Tomorrow I can smooth the finish down with very fine steelwool and then put the finish coat on.

This new revolver still needs to be put on my pistol permit (NY) before I can legally shoot it. I look forward to testing it for accuracy.

Regards,
Richard

Hi, yesterday my son-in-law and I put the new Pietta "1862" Police to the test shooting .38 Special (148gr Speer HBWC and 2.7gr Trail Boss) using a Howell 38 Colt (38 Special) conversion cylinder. Groups were 6" high and ~3" diameter @ 25yds. The 5.5" barrel makes for a compact beefy revolver that is very easy to hold and aim, a natural pointer. In fact, my son-in-law shot the Pietta 1862 more accurately than his 5.5" 1858 Remington yesterday - take that Johnnie.

While the Pietta 1862 is a lot beefier than the Uberti 1862, I appreciate the 6-shots and very steady hold of the Pietta. Calling the Pietta 1862 an 1861 Colt helps with history.

Regards,
Richard
There’s nothing better in the morning than the smell of bacon and black powder smoke!