Author Topic: Dimensions  (Read 2812 times)

Offline sourdough

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Re: Dimensions
« Reply #15 on: December 24, 2015, 02:59:13 PM »
I'm hesitant to buy used unless I know the owner. Especially over the Internet. That leaves me with just Uberti.

Hi rodwha, not long ago I bought a used 1858 carbine from a Remmy message board member. It was a mess, lots of crappy amateur gunsmithing on the carbine, was even unsafe. Many new users of BP firearms seem to have a burning desire to modify their firearm and make it their own and somehow better. Better rarely happens. Since that buying experience, I have sworn off buying used, it's new or nothing.

Of course, the collector may have no choice but to buy used because a desired BP firearm isn't currently manufactured.

The value in buying new from a reputable supplier is that the firearm can be returned for replacement or credit if the firearm is defective. Trying to return a used firearm is a path to bad feelings and arguments.

IMO buy new and don't look back.  L@. L@. L@.

Regards,
Richard

Richard,

I have had somewhat the same experience when buying a 50+ year old replica 1848 Colt Pocket Pistol (Replica Arms El Paso Texas/ASM) manufacture date XIX/1963 earlier this year. Looked nice on GB but had the seller caveat "no returns", and I paid more than I should have because my squareback TG penchant said I really needed this pistol. Still, all in all, it is a fairly rare/obsolete early repro ASM pistol with all matching serial numbers (228) on four parts with Italian proofs on the frame, barrel, and cylinder.

It functioned well when I received it, but when I took it apart to inspect and clean it I found that probably no one had ever disassembled it thoroughly to clean it as the clearances increased considerably when all of the internal crud was judiciously removed. I should have paid attention to the fact that NONE of the screws had a hint of ever being removed.

Having said that, when it comes to old/older repros from ASM/Navy Arms/ASP/Replica Arms/et al, don't look for a shooter as much a replica collector piece just to gaze at and play with. I think it is just nice to have for mid to late 20th century nostalgia. I am 63 and still remember going through DGW catalogs with my Dad in the mid-sixties: a very good time, indeed. I have no money available for even rusty originals.

If one wants a shooter, brand new ones are comparatively cheap and function well, even if there are minor problems with timing and such. Those can easily be corrected before the pistol goes south. My ASM replica 1848 Colt Pocket Pistol Squareback .31 cal 6" barrel with loading lever is going to live in a glass top display case, and it will be a reminder to think out my next purchase more thoroughly, as well as what the industry produced in that era.

Having said that, I am a day or two away from ordering from Cabela's a Pietta Griswold and Gunnison .36 brasser to go with my Pietta 1851 Navy steel 2nd Model squareback. I am checking every few hours to see if it goes on sale, but I doubt it will. In that case, I will pay the $220 price, but I gotta have that barrel.

Merry Christmas everyone!

Jim



Jim


Offline scooby

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Re: Dimensions
« Reply #16 on: December 24, 2015, 06:44:39 PM »
Very good words spoken Jim when it comes to buying certain used collectable reproductions. Your philosophy matches mine. I have refurbished a ton of used reproduction revolvers over the years, and even some of the sketchy ones turned out to be fine shooters. Quite a few of them ended up with a total exterior refinish in order to make them presentable enough to meet my standards.

I also am a proponent of the philosophy that if you want a guaranteed shooter, then quit trying to save  a twenty dollar bill by buying from an auction site and buy a new one. Most of these used reproductions were handled by some dolt that had no idea how to work a percussion revolver anyway, and likely to have owner induced issues. But if you are looking for the obsolete versions, then you will be taking a chance with each purchase.

My biggest dissapointment to date was a Palmeto 1855 side hammer revolver. The little jewel had never had a round fired from it, but the gouges left to the finish by the idiots using screw drivers and other metal implements to try and disassemble it was disgusting. Any one with a bit of common sence about guns could have figured out the particulars of this revolver without prying on it with metal tools . Fast forward to the point that I received it, the exterior now looks brand new and it is a fully presentable modle to every scrupulous eye that has held it since. In the end, the purchase price and extra effort that I put into it was fully doable with my capabilities. I ended up with a somewhat rare collectable with moderate cost and minimal effort. But I was subject to the gamble when I started in on the bid and the pictures shown did not identify the damage to the exterior finish. However, all is good now and I ended up with what I was wanting.

Offline Captainkirk

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Re: Dimensions
« Reply #17 on: December 24, 2015, 09:17:32 PM »
Very good words spoken Jim when it comes to buying certain used collectable reproductions. Your philosophy matches mine. I have refurbished a ton of used reproduction revolvers over the years, and even some of the sketchy ones turned out to be fine shooters. Quite a few of them ended up with a total exterior refinish in order to make them presentable enough to meet my standards.

I also am a proponent of the philosophy that if you want a guaranteed shooter, then quit trying to save  a twenty dollar bill by buying from an auction site and buy a new one. Most of these used reproductions were handled by some dolt that had no idea how to work a percussion revolver anyway, and likely to have owner induced issues. But if you are looking for the obsolete versions, then you will be taking a chance with each purchase.

My biggest dissapointment to date was a Palmeto 1855 side hammer revolver. The little jewel had never had a round fired from it, but the gouges left to the finish by the idiots using screw drivers and other metal implements to try and disassemble it was disgusting. Any one with a bit of common sence about guns could have figured out the particulars of this revolver without prying on it with metal tools . Fast forward to the point that I received it, the exterior now looks brand new and it is a fully presentable modle to every scrupulous eye that has held it since. In the end, the purchase price and extra effort that I put into it was fully doable with my capabilities. I ended up with a somewhat rare collectable with moderate cost and minimal effort. But I was subject to the gamble when I started in on the bid and the pictures shown did not identify the damage to the exterior finish. However, all is good now and I ended up with what I was wanting.
Oh, c'mon Scooby...you can't leave us hanging like that! Pictures?
"You gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"

Offline scooby

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Re: Dimensions
« Reply #18 on: December 24, 2015, 11:18:54 PM »
OK Kirk, in the next day or so, I will put up some brand new pics. It is one heck of a neat Colt/Root reproduction. Fun to shoot too!!!!!

Offline mazo kid

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Re: Dimensions
« Reply #19 on: December 29, 2015, 01:30:38 PM »
We have an auction place about 20 miles away. They sell a lot of State, municipal, school surplus items. Some auctions have DNR confiscations and police trade ins. Anyway, last year I bid on some black powder guns and got those. They were described as used, with some pictures. They even suggest viewing before bidding, but I didn't. I did get a couple of nice guns, but one revolver was pretty loose. I pulled the arbor out, drilled and tapped the front for a set screw, and put it back together, all nice and snug now. If I had looked at the guns before-hand, I might not have bid on that one. However, with a little work it is a good shooter now. It won't win any beauty contests but it is a good gun. And unlike some on-line auctions where you can return guns within 3 days, there is not that option here. Caveat emptor!