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Author Topic: Your story!  (Read 448 times)

Offline Captainkirk

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Your story!
« on: March 31, 2019, 11:27:46 AM »
David Byrne and the Talking Heads first asked the question years ago; "And you may ask yourself, well, how did I get here?"
How DID you get here?
Tell us your personal story of how you managed to climb aboard the Black Powder Train. Don't spare any details...when did you first get the bug? Childhood? Recently, What influenced you, from movies to TV shows, to watching others and having your curiosity aroused?
There are many members here. All of us come from different locales, backgrounds, educational and economic situations, and other variances, yet we all ended up here, sharing our knowledge and love of BP and particularly, Colt firearms.
I want to hear everyone's story no matter how long or short!
So...how did you get here?
"You gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"

Offline drobs

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Re: Your story!
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2019, 02:04:34 PM »
I like guns and bought my 1st shotgun at age 16. In college (mid 1990s), I bought my 1st handgun a Glock 21. Have a ton of modern guns and do enjoy those.

In 2000 I visited a Civil War Reenactment at The Grove in Glenview, Illinois. FC Sutler had a tent and was selling all manner of neat guns and clothing.
Grabbed a business card. Did a little research and bought a Pietta 1858 from FC Sutler and a Kirst Conversion cylinder in 2001. While I had an Illinois gun card - FOID at the time I saw assembling a firearm with components bought online, a way of saying "Screw You" to Illinois and their crazy gun laws. 

Shot the gun a couple times, the action was gritty. The combination costed as much as a Ruger Blackhawk. Shelved the gun for 13 years. In 2014, before heading off to Africa - I decided I wanted to shoot it in its original configuration. Chatted with some knowledgeable folks over at my other favorite forum - survivalistboards.com, bought some caps, Pyrodex pellets, and round ball. Fired it off and was hooked!

Have 6 C&B revolvers now (2 Remingtons & 4 Colts) + a Lyman Great Plains percussion rifle. 
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Offline Hawg

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Re: Your story!
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2019, 04:45:26 PM »
I got a .22 single action for my 10th birthday, An FIE Buffalo Scout. By the time I was 12 the timing was off and the barrel was loose in the frame. I saved my grass cutting money and got my mom to take me to a gunshop in the next town. My intention was to get a new .22 but when I got there one of the first things I saw was a 58 Remington and I had to have it. I bought the gun, a tin of caps, a pound of powder and a bullet mold. IIRC I paid just under 60 bucks for all of it. The guy behind the counter only gave me rudimentary advise on loading it. A powder measure was never mentioned nor wads, lube or anything else. The fact that it was constantly chain firing didn't faze me. I finally figured out if I put a drop of oil on the top of the balls it wouldn't chain. A year later I bought a flintlock rifle but it wouldn't spark for anything so I gave up on flintlocks and never bought another one. When I was 15 I got my drivers license and a 67 Mustang and girls were my main focus so I kinda got away from it. I got married at 19 and a couple of years later I got back into it and been into it ever since. 
Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for thou art crunchy and tasteth good with ketchup.

Offline Bishop Creek

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Re: Your story!
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2019, 04:52:24 PM »
As I mentioned on another thread, I started in 1969 right after I graduated from high school. Bought my first one, an 1851 brass frame model, at the "Gun Shop" at Knott's Berry Farm for $60. The gun shop there sold only black powder revolvers and knives. Bet it's long gone now though, been 45 years or more since I've been to Knott's.
Back in '69 there was very little info out there on loading and shooting them so I taught myself how to load the revolver. Knew nothing about using lube until I got my hands on one of Sam Fadela's Black Powder manuals. I had been fascinated with black powder guns ever since seeing Disney's "Davy Crockett" on TV in 1955 and later became a real Civil War buff during the Centennial during the 1960s when I was a teenager. The revolver was stolen from me sometime around 1975 so I next purchased an 1858 Remington replica. Have bought and sold many over the years, at one point I had about 20 black powder guns including a custom made flintlock. Down to around 10 or so cap and ball revolvers now.

Edit: Here is a photo of my first revolver taken in Nov. of 1969.
« Last Edit: March 31, 2019, 05:14:48 PM by Bishop Creek »

Offline Dellbert

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Re: Your story!
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2019, 05:06:39 PM »
My dad started teaching me about the modern guns when I was just a youngster. From that I stuck with the modern guns till I got in my late twenties. Went with two of my friends to a gun range back in the late 70s and one of them had a black powder rifle that he hunted with. He ask me if I wanted to give it a try and that started the whole thang. So I happen to be in the LGS and saw a Hawken bp rifle hanging on the wall and bought it. I started learning from some of the guys at the range, and from some of the older guys around here at home how use it correctly. About 1989 looking through a Gander Mountain magazine and saw a 1858 Remington and couldn't get it off my mind so I ordered it. Nobody where I live was shooting bp pistoles so I was left on my own. I read the book that came with it and learned as much about the gun as I could, how to load it, clean it, taking it apart, and put it back together so yes I went down the long road to teaching myself how to load and shoot my pistol. I found other books to read that helped out a lot also. I stuck with that Hawken rifle, and 1858 Remmie for a long time. Still have that 58, and she]s one of the best shooters I have. Well the internet came into the picture. I saw a picture of the 1858 Remington with the short barrel. I wanted that pistol to go with the one I already have. That started a whole chain of events that lead me to the Colt models and then I ran into the bp forums. CK invited me to come over to where he was hanging out and those guys took me in and I stuck with them. Then you guys had started up the Colt forum and I like the Colts also so here I am still learning a lot of stuff from you guys on the two forums. so now I have more Remington's and Colt black powder handguns than I know what to do with. That don't count the bp rifles.

Offline ShotgunDave

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Re: Your story!
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2019, 06:20:58 PM »
This is a great idea Capt. Love the stories.

Back in 1991, I applied for and got, my FFL. I was working at a body shop in Palm Springs then, and the owner's best friend owned a gun shop across the street. I was doing a lot of trading with him at that time and in one of the trades I did, there were two BP pistols. A Ruger Old Army and an FIE 51 Navy. I had always been interested in BP guns, I just hadn't owned one myself. So I gathered up the necessary things I needed to shoot them and off I went to the range. Oddly enough, the Ruger did nothing for me. I've always like historical things, and the Ruger just didn't fit the bill. But that brass framed Navy was awesome! It was like holding history in my hand. I've had BP guns ever since. I love them so much, I've sold off and traded away all my modern guns. I only have BP now. I just acquired my first flintlock rifle on Saturday. I fear it may be another rabbit hole I'm about to go down.
"Never trust quotes from the internet"
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Offline Bishop Creek

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Re: Your story!
« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2019, 07:39:40 PM »
Flintlocks can be a rabbit hole, but if you have a good lock and the right flints they are fantastic!
Check out these flints from Track of the Wolf. It's where I purchased mine.

https://www.trackofthewolf.com/list/item.aspx/141/1

Offline LonesomePigeon

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Re: Your story!
« Reply #7 on: March 31, 2019, 08:25:42 PM »
 Got into bp about 3 years ago. Until then I'd never shot anything but a BB gun and I think once a .22 rifle. As a teenager I had read all the Louis L'Amour books and one day I just thought I'd see how much it would cost to buy an antique Colt revolver. Looked online and found Cabela's repros instead. I bought a Uberti Walker and then found a local muzzleloading club. Now I have a bunch of bp repros and a few cartridge guns.

Offline Hawg

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Re: Your story!
« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2019, 12:37:57 AM »
Some good stories here and all of them are interesting. I can't remember all of the bp guns I've had over the years. I lost some of my best revolvers in a theft several years ago and never replaced them and I sold some others. Now I'm down to four revolvers, four rifles and two shotguns. I have some guns I usually only shoot bp in but I'm not counting those.
Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for thou art crunchy and tasteth good with ketchup.

Offline ssb73q

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Re: Your story!
« Reply #9 on: April 01, 2019, 04:08:47 AM »
Hi, I was always fascinated in firearms and archery as a kid. BB guns, bows and arrows, were a major part of my life. Learned to shoot .22s at summer camp. When old enough to hunt, my parents purchased a 12ga for me. I made .22 zip guns and muzzle loading handguns that used match heads for propellant and cap-gun caps for ignition. Even brought them to school to show my friends and understanding teachers. Joined the Navy and became a Fire Control Technician (large guns control) on a Destroyer. I would always hold my head outside the gun director hatch just to take in the blast and smell of cordite from 5" guns. Since then, got serious with the shooting sports with modern firearms, very serious.

As I got older, I appreciated the historical aspect of firearms more and more. That interest stimulated my involvement in BP firearms that is now an obsession. Once you go black, you'll never go back.  &\? &\? &\?

Regards,
Richard

 

 
Thereís nothing better in the morning than the smell of bacon and black powder smoke!

Offline Captainkirk

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Re: Your story!
« Reply #10 on: April 01, 2019, 12:59:59 PM »
Like most kids that grew up during the '60s, I learned to hold a die-cast Kilgore cap gun shortly after I learned to hold a fork and spoon. I began shooting .22 rifles around age 9 after my dad signed me up for a local NRA rifle club, and was completely taken over by it. In fact, I used to sneak some of the empty brass home and sniff the burnt powder...LOL! A friend borrowed me a book on the history of the gun, filled with many drawings and photos of guns from the matchlock all the way to modern guns, but the ones that really grabbed my attention were the black powder guns. Not sure why, but the allure of not having to use cartridges was somehow fascinating. I found my first 1858 Remington around 1983 and bought it without having a clue how to load it or shoot it; and nobody in the gun shop I got it from knew either! (no internet or You Tube help then) Fortunately, I also found the writings of Sam Fadala, and figured out what I needed for my first shooting session, and from then on I was hooked.
"You gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"

Offline Yolla Bolly Brad

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Re: Your story!
« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2019, 06:39:41 PM »
I can still remember how addicting that smell of a 22 rimfire was as a kid!

Offline G Dog

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Re: Your story!
« Reply #12 on: April 01, 2019, 11:17:46 PM »
Heard of a van
all loaded with weapons
packed up and ready to go ...

                  D. Byrne/Talking Heads - Life During Wartime



I got my very own personal .22 single shot rifle from Sears for Christmas when I was ten or eleven. By then Iíd been schooled on shooting my dadís on duty S&W .38 K-frame, his off duty .38 snub, and a .22 Sears High Standard Sentinel, nine shot, four inch.

Iíve been crazy about C&B revolvers since I was just a little kid. I have no recollection of when I first became conscious of those.  Got my first ďreproĒ in second grade, a Nichols, and everyone agreed it was the coolest cap gun in our LA hood.  They were right - it was. I actually kept that thing until my first year in college when my parentís home got burged.  Imagine pulling a burglary and thieving a toy gun but I also lost some real firearms on that deal and try not to think of it too much.

Got my first real C&B very used brass Navy type when I was thirteen as pay for helping a neighbor load a moving truck all day long.  I was so happy about getting it that I like-ta-died. It grouped pretty well, ackshully.  Lost it in that burglary four years later.  Killed a javalina with it over by the Arizona line when he charged me and my horse.  That was the most satisfying shot I ever made in my life and a dead smelly little peccary beats a big vet bill, anytime. (They donít call them Ďstink pigsí for nothing). The males get very ill tempered during mating season. That that old Navy repro got me out of such a jam made the event special and the gun even more so. It had a cylinder to forcing cone gap you could have tossed a puppy through, but I loved it anyway. The arbor was solid. By the time I lost it at age seventeen I also owned an 1860 which I kept (unloaded and very much against the rules) in the dorm where I lived and took it off campus to shoot regularly.  Things just went from there and got better and better.  Thatís some of the story; itís been quite a party.

Where I started, second grade:





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Offline mazo kid

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Re: Your story!
« Reply #13 on: April 02, 2019, 08:38:56 AM »
When I was growing up in a tiny rural town, my dad had his own electrical business. I got the scrap pieces of copper wire he would bring home, cleaned them off and sold them to the local blacksmith. He had two Japanese rifles on a beam in his shop; one was very nicely finished and the other was a rough looking one. The latter one followed me home after paying the princely sum of $3.00! It was a "last ditch" rifle.  I was about 10 at the time. When I was 13, I worked a summer on my Uncle's farm, making $1.00 a day plus room and board. I took my first 2 weeks pay, walked up to the hardware store and bought a new Remington bolt action single shot 22. So, that was my start; I have always had an interest in old guns and old cars. I was also interested in the Civil War, had a goodly collection of stuff from that era. I got interested in muzzleloaders; heard about a "class" at the Vocational school called "Machine Shop Special". What was the instructor going to call it....."How to Build a ML Rifle"?!  That would not have gotten by the administrators! Anyway, I built my first ML from scratch, then got a '58 Remington at a store that was going out of business for $58.00, joined the local ML club and I was off and running. I was an early member on the Muzzleloaders Forum, think my membership number was around 158. I was quite active there until Captain Kirk beckoned to me. Over the years, I have managed to get a pretty nice collection of nice (and not so nice!) guns, and got to meet some very nice folks along the way. That's my story, and I'm sticking to it!
« Last Edit: April 02, 2019, 08:45:16 AM by mazo kid »

Offline StrawHat

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Re: Your story!
« Reply #14 on: April 12, 2019, 03:59:25 AM »
Nice idea, good to hear how folks got started.

Kevin
Knowledge carried to the grave unshared, is wasted.

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