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Author Topic: Uberti 1860  (Read 1042 times)
StrawHat
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« on: January 29, 2016, 05:05:31 PM »

Just took some new photos of the old guns.  Here is a shot of two of the Uberti 1860s.

Kevin
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Knowledge should be shared, not hoarded.

Knowledge I take to my grave, is wasted.

I prefer to use cartridges designed before my Father was born!
Baron Von Kesselwalker
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« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2016, 02:01:22 PM »

nice
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StrawHat
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Posts: 289


« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2016, 05:14:59 PM »

Thank you.  Lately, I have been paying more attention to the Pocket Police revolvers and actually forgot I had them.  They look good with the other revolvers.

Kevin
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Knowledge should be shared, not hoarded.

Knowledge I take to my grave, is wasted.

I prefer to use cartridges designed before my Father was born!
Wild Wilkie
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Long Time Cowboy Wild Wilkie


« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2016, 07:59:10 AM »

I have always wondered how Colt made those barrels with the curved part adjoining the frame.  Were they forging them in closed dies and then machining them?  I just don't know how good the die forging processes were in the 1860's.  They could have forged them with a lump of metal  there and used tracer milling to make the contours.  The round part of the barrel was easy, as was the barrel bore and rifling, but that transition must have been a bugger to make.  Some skilled hand grinding or filing would have been needed to blend in the round to the curved part and make the parts consistant barrel to barrel.  Compared to the Model 1851 which was slab-sided and easier to machine, those curves made it more difficult while saving weight.  I can see straddle milling the octagon 1851 barrel almost complete.

Wilkie
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StrawHat
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Posts: 289


« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2016, 04:48:11 PM »

Wild Wilkie,

I believe the 1860 and 1861 barrels were forged and then polished, but that is something I only dimly recall hearing in my youth.  I know hammer forging is not a new process and has been around for centuries, just not sure if it was employed at the Colts factory.

Kevin
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Knowledge should be shared, not hoarded.

Knowledge I take to my grave, is wasted.

I prefer to use cartridges designed before my Father was born!
Navy Six
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Posts: 85

Only Blackpowder Is Interesting


« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2016, 03:39:53 PM »

When was Uberti making 1860 Armies with the fluted cylinders? I had a Signature Series With the fluted cylinder and the look really grew on me. Know what you mean about the various Pocket models. They kind of fill in the gaps when you have most of the bigger stuff. When the weather breaks and I finish off other projects, there is a 49 Pocket and a Pocket Navy, both Ubertis, that I need to get out and shoot. The various cap & ball guns are sure fun and have added a whole new dimension and interest to shooting.
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StrawHat
Sr. Member
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Posts: 289


« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2016, 04:23:27 AM »

When was Uberti making 1860 Armies with the fluted cylinders? I had a Signature Series With the fluted cylinder and the look really grew on me. Know what you mean about the various Pocket models. They kind of fill in the gaps when you have most of the bigger stuff. When the weather breaks and I finish off other projects, there is a 49 Pocket and a Pocket Navy, both Ubertis, that I need to get out and shoot. The various cap & ball guns are sure fun and have added a whole new dimension and interest to shooting.

Navy Six,

According to the date code, one was built in 1996 and the other in 2013.  I have a pair of 1861s from 1970, full flutes.

Kevin
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Knowledge should be shared, not hoarded.

Knowledge I take to my grave, is wasted.

I prefer to use cartridges designed before my Father was born!
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