Author Topic: Dance and Brothers Revolver  (Read 13944 times)

Offline tomahawk

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 50
    • View Profile
Dance and Brothers Revolver
« on: February 24, 2011, 03:47:14 PM »
My latest purchase, a Pietta Dance and Brothers revolver. I see what Dr. Davis means about the back strap, no gun Dance or Colt or any other I know of, had that extreme sweep at the lower butt. It can be fixed though. According to Wiggins book it does'nt look like any two Dances had exactly the same grip shape.
This is my first Pietta and there will never be another! Uberti would never allow a gun this poorly finished to leave their factory. Brass and metal both are full of tool marks, edges that should be sharp are rounded off, wood to metal fit is acceptable but still not up to Uberti's standards. My inclination at this point is to remove the finish completely and give it a lightly aged finish, reshape the grip and try to work out some of the tool marks. Any opinions?
TOMAHAWK
« Last Edit: February 24, 2011, 04:21:04 PM by tomahawk »

Offline Rock Island

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 100
    • View Profile
Re: Dance and Brothers Revolver
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2011, 06:29:07 PM »
Don't know about the Pietta Dance, but the various Pietta's I do have such as the Remington 1858's, Colt 1860's, Starr's , LeMat and so on are very well finished, no problems at all so far.  Uberti makes nice revolvers also, I have a pile of them, all the usual stuff, Dragoon's, Walker, pocket model, navy models, great shooters, look great, no problems with them either.  Sorry to hear you got a lemon, it happens.
If it shoots then I have it, am about to get it, want it, or plotting to get it

Offline Fingers McGee

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 329
    • View Profile
Re: Dance and Brothers Revolver
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2011, 07:42:48 PM »
Interesting.   My experience with recent Pietta manufactured revolvers has been just the opposite.  My Dance was made in 2007 (Traditions) and also have a Hickok from 2010 (Cabelas).  Both of them are excellent guns.
Fingers (Show Me MO smoke) McGee; SASS 28654-L-TG, NCOWS 3280; Alter Ego of Diabolical Ken, rangemaster and stage writer extraordinaire.  Founding member of Central Ozarks Western Shooters and member of Southern Missouri Rangers, Double M Cowboys, Owl Creek Raiders and the Ozark Posse

Offline tomahawk

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 50
    • View Profile
Re: Dance and Brothers Revolver
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2011, 11:13:56 PM »
How do you decipher the date code? I just had a friend stop by and his experience with Pietta was same as mine plus his was mechanically poor. His and mine both originated at Dixie. Could this be the problem, do they sell a lower quality?
TOMAHAWK

Offline Smokey

  • Domain Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 149
  • Smoke has no form, it simply is.
    • View Profile
    • Black Powder Smoke
Re: Dance and Brothers Revolver
« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2011, 11:58:18 PM »
Tomahawk,

Here is a chart of the date codes for your reference. http://blackpowdersmoke.com/smokey/year-codes/
For a Complete Directory of Black Powder Specialty Forums, Please Visit BlackPowderSmoke.com

Offline tomahawk

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 50
    • View Profile
Re: Dance and Brothers Revolver
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2011, 07:08:50 AM »
Thanks Smokey, my Dance is a 2008, was that a good year? Whats your opinion on the refinish idea?
TOMAHAWK

Offline Smokey

  • Domain Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 149
  • Smoke has no form, it simply is.
    • View Profile
    • Black Powder Smoke
Re: Dance and Brothers Revolver
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2011, 07:27:19 AM »
Tomahawk,

I don't know about the quality of the 2008 reproductions. As for my opinion on  refinishing, I am biased. I prefer the plain steel look.
For a Complete Directory of Black Powder Specialty Forums, Please Visit BlackPowderSmoke.com

Offline B. Miller

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
Re: Dance and Brothers Revolver
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2011, 06:04:55 PM »
I have a team mate that shoots a Uberti stainless Remington.  My Pietta stainless Remington is a much nicer finish.  Inside the frame both are rough.  They both shoot well though.

Bruce

Offline tomahawk

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 50
    • View Profile
Re: Dance and Brothers Revolver
« Reply #8 on: April 15, 2011, 03:12:11 PM »
Smokey,
 What is a good method of removing blue ? I've started on the Dance.
TOMAHAWK

Offline Smokey

  • Domain Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 149
  • Smoke has no form, it simply is.
    • View Profile
    • Black Powder Smoke
Re: Dance and Brothers Revolver
« Reply #9 on: April 15, 2011, 04:52:50 PM »
The cheapest method I know of is a nice vinegar bath. The best I recall, it takes only an hour or so of soaking. Could let it soak overnight. Remove and hit it with 0000 steel wool. Funny thing, I am thinking of giving one of mine a bath this weekend.
For a Complete Directory of Black Powder Specialty Forums, Please Visit BlackPowderSmoke.com

Offline tomahawk

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 50
    • View Profile
Re: Dance and Brothers Revolver
« Reply #10 on: April 15, 2011, 07:45:44 PM »
many thanks, I will post photos when the project is done.
TOMAHAWK

Offline StrawHat

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 30
    • View Profile
Re: Dance and Brothers Revolver
« Reply #11 on: April 16, 2011, 06:52:56 AM »
Smokey,
 What is a good method of removing blue ? I've started on the Dance.
TOMAHAWK

TOMAHAWK,

Are you going for an antique look or a stainless look?  There is a difference in how to achieve them.  I prefer the antique look but others like the bare metal.
Knowledge should be shared and not hoarded.

I prefer to hunt with cartridges introduced prior to my birth.

Offline tomahawk

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 50
    • View Profile
Re: Dance and Brothers Revolver
« Reply #12 on: April 16, 2011, 07:49:24 AM »
I am going for a aged look, finish worn off but metal not damaged. Bob Harn, a builder of fine flintlocks, suggested using mustard to get the look I want. Any other suggestions?
TOMAHAWK

Offline Smokey

  • Domain Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 149
  • Smoke has no form, it simply is.
    • View Profile
    • Black Powder Smoke
Re: Dance and Brothers Revolver
« Reply #13 on: April 16, 2011, 07:16:16 PM »
Thinking about the aged look. The thing about the aged look is if you don't like it you can always finish the debluing process and go with plain white steel, you can't do the reverse.
For a Complete Directory of Black Powder Specialty Forums, Please Visit BlackPowderSmoke.com

Offline StrawHat

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 30
    • View Profile
Re: Dance and Brothers Revolver
« Reply #14 on: April 17, 2011, 04:50:44 AM »
My thoughts on what an old finish look like are based on handling the old firearms.  Each one is a bit different but within each category there are many similarities.  For revolvers I have seen some that are almost totally devoid of finish but most of the ones I have dealt with have some of the finish left.  Faded, but still present.  Usually in protected areas like between the rammer and the barrel, or where the recoil shields meet the frame, or the sides of the hammer, or for revolvers with flutes cylinders, in the flutes.

When I go for an aged look, I try to imitate that and therefore do not strip the finish but remove it with care and leave some where it would have been found on an actual old firearm. 

Think about how the finish is removed from an old firearm.  Some is by contact with corrosives but much of it is by friction.  Being carried in a holster and the constant rubbing of the leather on the metal polishes the finish off the metal.  But only in places where the leather contacts the metal.  Cylinder fronts were rarely touched by the leather but were in contact with the black powder residue which removes the finish in a different way.  Sights were constant polished by the act of drawing the revolver and also shortened by the friction though it would take a lot of that action to shorten them enough to visibly see it.  (Unless a silver or gold coin was used as a replacement.  Then they would have a flattened top edge from being filed to sight it in {maybe} but certainly flettened from the work of the leather on the coin.)

Grips usually took the brunt of the damage.  Just being exposed while the rest of the revolver was covered in leather allowed the weather to work on the varnish and age it.  Same with things like tables, stirrups, ropes and just a well callused hand. 

On the metal, I use a green dish pad, synthetic steel wool, and rub area where the leather would have rubbed.  For the grips, I usually wear a rough old glove and handle the wood until it shows where I need to remove the finish and than use the green scratchy pad to accelerate the process.  A very light application of acid in spots can sometimes etch the metal but should be used sparingly.  Sometimes I will remove wood from where it mates with the frame to simulate shrinkage, not much, just a sliver.

Plated revolvers get a differnet treatment as they age differently than blued ones.

If this sounds like a bit of work, you're correct.  But I don't care for the totally bare metal look.  And I have not found a shortcut that gives me the look I like.  Most of the easy methods remove all the finish with little or no control about leaving anything behind.

This is one I have started and you can see some of the barrel finish has been removed as well as the high points on the cylinder.



This photo shows a more fully aged revolver with a new one.  You can see where I left the finish in the protected areas.



In this photo, the top revolver was stripped partially and then has been carreid and used for about 30 years.  You can see how different it looks from the bottom revovler that was only stripped maybe 5 years ago.



To get a aged look, you need to proceed slowly.  Much of the aging is a subtle process and I have not yet figured out how to speed it up.  WIth very few exceptions, chains or beating with rods and such does not add anything.

Good luck.
Knowledge should be shared and not hoarded.

I prefer to hunt with cartridges introduced prior to my birth.