Author Topic: Need help with Schneider & Glassick revolver  (Read 3660 times)

Offline glwhitl

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Need help with Schneider & Glassick revolver
« on: December 23, 2011, 10:12:52 PM »
I am brand new to this forum and I need some help identifying a revolver. The only markings on it are SCHNEIDER & GLASSICK MEMPHIS. TENNESSEE. There is a 26 on the brass in front of the trigger. All the references to S&G that I can find indicate they only built Navy .36's, so any help would be appreciated.

Offline glwhitl

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Re: Need help with Schneider & Glassick revolver
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2011, 10:17:20 PM »
I forgot the pic of the S&G stamp on top of the barrel

Offline Fingers McGee

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Re: Need help with Schneider & Glassick revolver
« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2011, 12:08:02 AM »
All the references to S&G that I can find indicate they only built Navy .36's, so any help would be appreciated.

You are correct.  The Schneider and Glassick was only made in .36 caliber and there probably weren't more than 25 of them made - if that many.  What you have appears to be one of Allesandro Pietta's Italian fantasy guns that someone defarbed and remarked with the intention of fooling someone, or for use in reenactments.  There were no brass framed .44 caliber revolvers made before, during, or after the Civil War.  They are a fabrication that started in the 1950s

Are there any markings under the loading lever that might give it's origin away?
Fingers (Show Me MO smoke) McGee; SASS 28654-L-TG, NCOWS 3280; Alter Ego of Diabolical Ken, rangemaster and stage writer extraordinaire.  Founding member of Central Ozarks Western Shooters and member of Southern Missouri Rangers, Double M Cowboys, Owl Creek Raiders and the Ozark Posse

Offline glwhitl

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Re: Need help with Schneider & Glassick revolver
« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2011, 03:04:53 AM »
Thanks Fingers: There are no markings under the loading lever, or anywhere else on the gun and I have gone over it with a fine tooth comb. If this gun was made in the 1950's would it not have been blued? Thanks again for the help.

Offline Fingers McGee

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Re: Need help with Schneider & Glassick revolver
« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2011, 12:06:58 PM »
Yes, finished replicas are generally blued.  Since there are no marking on this one to indicate date of manufacture, it could have been made anytime between the 1950s and now.  It also could have been a kit gun to start.  Many kit guns didn't have proof marks or serial numbers; and, most time required final polish and finishing.  The brown patina on barrel and cylinder of this revolver could be from an unfinished gun just laying around for a few years, or could be artificially applied.
Fingers (Show Me MO smoke) McGee; SASS 28654-L-TG, NCOWS 3280; Alter Ego of Diabolical Ken, rangemaster and stage writer extraordinaire.  Founding member of Central Ozarks Western Shooters and member of Southern Missouri Rangers, Double M Cowboys, Owl Creek Raiders and the Ozark Posse

Offline tomahawk

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Re: Need help with Schneider & Glassick revolver
« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2011, 01:53:49 PM »
If you will look under the Dance Bros posting you will find before and after photos of an Pietta Dance confederate revolver that I removed all the Italian marks and aged the finish. On a Dance there is no chance of mistaking them for originals so its safe to do.
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Offline glwhitl

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Re: Need help with Schneider & Glassick revolver
« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2012, 02:38:18 PM »
Here is an update on the "Schneider & Glassick". I took out a screw and discovered it was not hand made. I believe any civil war era screws would have been hand made. After that I removed the wood grips and found they had been burnt which is a common aging technique. In short it IS a fake. Someone went to a lot of trouble to try to fool people, and I will admit it had me going for a while.  :-[ thanks for your posts.

Offline Junkman

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Re: Need help with Schneider & Glassick revolver
« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2012, 11:03:06 PM »
You are wrong about Civil War era screws. The American Civil War was well into the machine age and screws were machine made by that time.
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Offline Southron

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Re: Need help with Schneider & Glassick revolver
« Reply #8 on: October 02, 2013, 10:15:41 AM »
By the late 1820's John  Hall had perfected the manufacture of arms on "automatic" machinery that had all of their parts fully interchangeable. This requires holding the tolerances of the individual parts to one 3,000ths or less of an inch.

By "automatic machinery" I mean machinery (mostly milling machines) that were "set up" to make one cut. The workpiece would be clamped on the first machine by a boy and the machine turned on. After that first cut was made, the workpiece would be moved to another machine, clamped and another cut made. This would continue until the workpiece was a finished gun part.

What was so "revolutionary" about Hall's system of fully interchangeable manufacture was that it allowed the mass production of firearms and at the same time, did away with the need for lots of skilled gun makers.

Before Hall's invention, all guns were literally "made by hand" and consequently, guns were expensive. Hall's invention allowed for guns of better quality to be made and at the same time a lot cheaper.

Without Hall's system of "Fully Interchangeable System of Manufacturing" our modern world could not exist. Almost everything we use today from computers to automobiles are built using interchangeable parts. Thank You Mr. Hall!

P.S. Yeah, Yeah I know Eli Whitney gets the "credit" for "inventing" the system of interchangeability but in reality Whitney laid the groundwork for John Hall. Whitney did invent the milling machine.