Author Topic: My buffalo  (Read 545 times)

Offline bladesmith

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My buffalo
« on: February 24, 2018, 12:56:38 PM »
About two years ago I bought a Pietta buffalo modal pistol and still haven't shot it. Now today I'm waiting for the postman to deliver a carbine I bought off Gunbroker. About 15 years ago I shot at Friendship in the pistol matches, then quite going and sold everything. Now I'm getting back into the Remington pistols and the first nice day up here in Michigan I'll be out shooting them both. It'll feel good again to breath some smoke.
Remington nut

Offline bladesmith

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Re: My buffalo
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2018, 06:03:57 PM »
Well, received the carbine today. It's also a Pietta, same as the buffalo gun. I took the trigger guard off both looking for any crap left in them - both looked clean as a whistle, and trigger pulls were acceptable. Now to get out and shoot em. 
Remington nut

Offline Captainkirk

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Re: My buffalo
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2018, 01:23:58 PM »
Is your Buffalo brass or steel-framed?
"You gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"

Offline bladesmith

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Re: My buffalo
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2018, 03:04:12 PM »

Brass, didn't know they were made in steel. I might be wrong, but unless it's shot a lot, I don't feel it will be hurt. I see about 40grs of 3F will fit - will shooting a heavy load on occasion make it shoot loose ? Were it a Colt style, I can see where that might happen, but not so much with a closed top frame.
Remington nut

Offline Captainkirk

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Re: My buffalo
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2018, 02:27:07 PM »

Brass, didn't know they were made in steel. I might be wrong, but unless it's shot a lot, I don't feel it will be hurt. I see about 40grs of 3F will fit - will shooting a heavy load on occasion make it shoot loose ? Were it a Colt style, I can see where that might happen, but not so much with a closed top frame.

In a word; yes.
Do not shoot with loads exceeding 25gr 3F or equivalent MAX unless you want some shiny wall art.
20gr and under preferable.
There were some steel framed Buffaloes made but I believe they were destined for the Canadian market if memory serves. Once in a while one surfaces on GunBroker. If you like the gun, any Pietta steel frame should be a drop-in fit and handle all the powder you can stuff down the holes.
While the brass topstrap frame "appears" tougher, you will still stretch them and imprint the recoil shield by using hot loads, same as any other Remmy brasser.

"You gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"

Offline sourdough

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Re: My buffalo
« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2018, 07:05:11 PM »
Listen to Kirk.

He won't steer you wrong.

I have a 1851 Navy .36 Griswold and Gunnison brasser and never has been a round shot through it because of that. It is a very nice collector item, and it shall remain so.

Jim

Offline Captainkirk

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Re: My buffalo
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2018, 01:26:21 PM »
A brass framed Buffalo or carbine sort of defeats the whole purpose, IMHO. Both were designed to function at longer distances and the longer barrels allow pressures to spike higher than on a normal 8" barrel. Naturally, for longer shooting distances one would prefer as hot of a load as one could pack in. Limiting one of these to 25 grains or less seems rather ridiculous IMHO but any more than that and damage WILL occur.
Watch eBay or Gunbroker for a used steel frame, would be my advice.
"You gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"

Offline bladesmith

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Re: My buffalo
« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2018, 01:46:21 PM »
Thanks for the heads up on the brass frames.
Remington nut

Offline Captainkirk

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Re: My buffalo
« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2018, 03:21:43 PM »
Glad I could help.
Don't get me wrong; I LIKE the brassers for a number of reasons;

1) By far the smoothest and easiest cocking revolvers (due to brass being a natural bearing surface material)

2) Appears to retain lubrication longer (my observations only)

3) Very easy to work, modify, sand, polish and contour

4) After above work, no bluing touch-up needed

5) Can be left to patina and quickly take on an antique look, or polished to look like gleaming gold plating

6) Easy to defarb, if desired

7) Brassers are way cheaper than steel counterparts; used ones in good condition can often be purchased for under $100.00 (ask me how I know)

8 ) Somewhat historically correct if taken in the right context (know your history before you shop!)

9) They work just fine with normal recommended target loads that these revolvers shoot most accurately with

10) They look cool (to me)

So, there you have it. The garden variety brasser can be a shooter, and a good one at that as long as you stay beneath the recommended max loadings (20gr for .36, 25gr for .44). There is no faster way to multiply your collection than to shop for nice used brassers. For the price of one steelie you can purchase two, sometimes three older brassers, and if your goal is to collect "Confederate" revolvers, then brassers are a must.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2018, 03:24:02 PM by Captainkirk »
"You gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"

Offline Captainkirk

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Re: My buffalo
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2018, 03:28:24 PM »
Right after posting this I found this ad on Armslist:
3 brassers for the price of 1

http://www.armslist.com/posts/7977815/san-luis-obispo-california-muzzle-loaders-for-sale--reproduction-revolvers
"You gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"

Offline sourdough

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Re: My buffalo
« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2018, 07:58:52 PM »
I know nothing about Remington NMA/NMN brassers, so I won't comment about that. I leave it to professionals like you.

The second pistol seems to be a repro G&G (part octagonal/part round barrel).36 but with what appears to be an engraved cylinder as opposed to a smooth cylinder.

The third pistol appears to be a repro S&G with a smooth cylinder.

The link supplied will not scroll down to see any more info. It would be nice to know manufacturers, date codes, et al. too bad that is the only photo.

I sure would like to see better pictures.

All in all, $150 is a good deal for all 3, no matter what they are. My problem is that the seller in CA says no shipping.

Jim

Offline Captainkirk

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Re: My buffalo
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2018, 09:01:53 PM »
They always say that, Jim...unless it's a dealer. When I find something I'm interested in I shoot an email ASKING if they will ship. Sometimes no, but I've bought more guns off AL than Auction Arms and Gunbroker combined. Most said "No Shipping"
If they say they will ship, ask for more pix and info. Usually they are happy to oblige.
I have sometimes had to convince people to ship by telling them Cabela's will ship to my door with proper ID and FOID info. Some folks are afraid to ship USPS; you can usually convince them otherwise by letting them know a BP gun is not considered a firearm in most states...no FFL required, therefore is not hazardous, dangerous, etc. Plus, if they disassemble the major components, it now becomes "gun parts" which is pretty much legal to ship anywhere. One guy shipped the guns in two separate $5.95 Flat Rate USPS boxes just to be safe. Sometimes you have to work the seller a bit to get them to ship, but I've mostly been successful.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2018, 09:30:01 PM by Captainkirk »
"You gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"

Offline Captainkirk

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Re: My buffalo
« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2018, 09:28:58 PM »
The Remington NMA brassers are fine guns as long as you stay under the 25gr max loading. Otherwise, the cylinder 'hammers' the recoil shield and put dents in it, and the frame will stretch over time and the barrel gap opens up. This leads to a slide hammer effect and the problem exacerbates itself and multiplies the damage. I found using my Pietta Target Remmy (steel frame) that the most accurate loads on paper are using 18gr 3F and a .454 RB...so if just punching paper, that should be an ideal load for the shiny-version Remington and it falls well below the risk zone.
The Colt-style brassers are more susceptible to recoil damage as; 1) the cylinder has actual 'teeth' on the back that will pound an imprint into the recoil shield, and; 2) the arbor is actually threaded into the brass recoil shield and held in place by a roll pin driven between the arbor and shield. On heavy recoil, the steel threads on the arbor actually stretch the brass threads; the arbor "shoots loose" and the pin begins to make the hole oblong. Once you've stretched the brass threads, no amount of red LocTite will hold it for more than a few dozen shots, nor will JB Weld. The only remedy is to get a new brass frame. It's far easier to be nice to your brass friend in the first place... ^")

To my knowledge, nobody has made a Remington Navy (.36) brasser for some time now. When one does show up on the auction sites they are usually well-used and usually manufactured/imported by PR/FIE. I would actually like to have one if I found a decent one. Trouble is, you never know if they have been abused or overcharged. It pays to ask questions and ask for lots of pictures.
"You gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"

Offline bladesmith

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Re: My buffalo
« Reply #13 on: March 14, 2018, 03:56:40 PM »
The 20 or so years I shot at Friendship on the pistol line I always used 20 grs at 25yds and 25 at 50yds. I didn't have change my sight picture.
Remington nut

Offline Captainkirk

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Re: My buffalo
« Reply #14 on: March 14, 2018, 06:32:17 PM »
I'm assuming that was a steel frame?
"You gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"