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Author Topic: Curing Spiced Coffee Bacon  (Read 114 times)

Offline Electric Miner

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Curing Spiced Coffee Bacon
« on: June 18, 2020, 10:08:12 AM »
Here is my recipe for Spiced Coffee bacon, also known as Dirty Chai bacon. Dirty Chai is a chai with a shot of espresso in it.

Method for curing

Everything in this recipe depends on the weight of the pork belly being cured. I work in grams, because it is more precise/easier than working in ounces.

You start by cutting your pork belly into manageable sized pieces. You may trim it to get a decent rectangle as well.

Weigh a piece of the pork belly. The weight of the ingredients for the dry cure is a percentage of the weight of the pork belly.

For example - if you have a 1000 gram piece of belly, and the recipe calls for 2% coarse kosher salt, you would use 20 grams of salt (1000 x 2% = 20).

Doing it this  way, rather than by tablespoon and teaspoon ensures the pieces of belly all get the proper amount of cure,  no matter what it weighs. Mix up the batch of cure for each piece of belly individually.

I then place the piece of belly into a vacuum bag, though you can use a large zip-loc bag. I spoon the cure mixture into the bag with the belly, rubbing it in, and spreading it out as evenly as I can. Use all the cure mixture you mixed for that piece of belly.

Then I vacuum seal the bag, making sure I get a good seal. The bags of pork belly go into a pan, in case of leaks, and into the refrigerator. Each day I flip the bags over, taking the time to rub the bag to move the cure around and eliminate any dry cure that is there.

Dry curing bacon is a bit of a misnomer, as the dry cure will pull moisture out of the pork belly, creating a "wet" cure in the bag.

After 10-14 days in the refrigerator, I remove the bacon from the bags, rinse it, dry it and put it in the refrigerator on racks overnight. The next day, I smoke the bacon. I smoke at low temps. If the outside temp stays below 40 degrees, I can smoke for a long time - in excess of 12 hours. This time of year, I smoke for 3 to 3-1/2 hours. For cold smoking bacon, I use an electric hot plate and a pan of pellets to provide smoke with little heat.

Once the smoking is done, I vacuum pack the bacon and put it back into the refrigerator for a week. Then it is sliced and repacked in 1-pound packages.


On to the recipe...

Ingredients

2% kosher salt
2% sugar
1% instant coffee
1% chai spice
0.25% cure#1

You could find a recipe for chai spice on the interweb and mix your own. I use chai spice from The Spice House in Milwaukee, WI. My family has done business with them for decades. I trust their spices.

That's the way it works.


The packages on the right are Spiced Coffee bacon. Any dry spice you see will be completely incorporated within a couple days.




Post smoking bacon.




Sliced bacon

« Last Edit: June 27, 2020, 11:54:02 AM by Electric Miner »

Offline ShotgunDave

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Re: Curing Spiced Coffee Bacon
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2020, 11:12:21 AM »
Thanks for sharing the steps EM. Very informative.

What is "Cure #1"?
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Offline Electric Miner

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Re: Curing Spiced Coffee Bacon
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2020, 11:22:45 AM »
Thanks for sharing the steps EM. Very informative.

What is "Cure #1"?


Prague Powder #1, also called Insta-Cure #1 or pink curing salt #1. It contains 6.25% sodium nitrite and 93.75% table salt. It kills off the nasty bugs, and keeps your bacon from making people sick. It also gives cured meat it's color and texture.

As an aside, take a look at any of the "uncured" hot dogs, sausages, or bacon in the store. Chances are they will have celery powder or something to do with celery. If that is the case, they are lying. Or they have a little disclaimer somewhere saying that the only nitrites come celery, or some other ingredient. Celery is a natural source of nitrites. Guess what? If it has nitrites, no matter what the source, it's cured.

Offline ShotgunDave

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Re: Curing Spiced Coffee Bacon
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2020, 04:21:51 PM »
Thanks EM. I'm learning stuff today!
"Never trust quotes from the internet"
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Offline Electric Miner

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Re: Curing Spiced Coffee Bacon
« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2020, 05:46:08 PM »
One more note. If you intend to start curing meat, Cure #1 and Cure #2 are not the same thing. Cure #1 is just salt and sodium nitrite. It is for curing on stuff that will cure for a short time, and be eaten soon, like bacon, or smoked salmon. Cure #2 has salt and both sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate. It is for doing long term curing, like hams, dried sausages, etc. It's for stuff that is going to cure for months, if not years.

Offline mazo kid

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Re: Curing Spiced Coffee Bacon
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2020, 12:32:49 PM »
You certainly enjoy your cooking abilities! Your grilled steak and cheese sandwiches look absolutely delicious. We have a friend who is a gourmet cook, but does no smoking of meats. His specialties are Chinese, Japanese, and French cooking, has a small fortune invested in pots, pans, dishes, and utensils

Offline mazo kid

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Re: Curing Spiced Coffee Bacon
« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2020, 07:29:26 PM »
EM, do you ever slice thick bacon? The reason I ask is that thick bacon is popular here. However, a pound is a pound, and the thick sliced bacon is more expensive, even though there is less work involved with slicing a pound.?

Offline Electric Miner

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Re: Curing Spiced Coffee Bacon
« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2020, 08:50:14 PM »
EM, do you ever slice thick bacon? The reason I ask is that thick bacon is popular here. However, a pound is a pound, and the thick sliced bacon is more expensive, even though there is less work involved with slicing a pound.?


Mine is generally about an eighth of an inch, oy maybe three sixteenths, thick give or take. I've never actually measured. On average, it take around twelve slices to make a pound.

Offline mazo kid

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Re: Curing Spiced Coffee Bacon
« Reply #8 on: June 27, 2020, 07:36:29 AM »
Your pictures looked so good that we had BLTs for lunch! Bacon is a treat for me, can't have it too often.