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Author Topic: Evolution of the (Colt) Revolver  (Read 575 times)

Offline Kim Hyatt

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Evolution of the (Colt) Revolver
« on: November 03, 2020, 09:48:41 PM »
I started collecting BP firearms with the intent to have something that I could shoot that was representative of the kinds of guns that my veteran ancestors carried during the Civil War. One ancestor in particular, my direct great-great-grandfather, was a first sergeant who received the Medal of Honor. Two other g-g-grandfathers were both officers, as I recall. I know that First Sergeant Hyatt was issued an Enfield rifle and also carried a saber. I don’t know anything about the others.

I began my modest collection with the purchase of a Zoli “Zouave” musket about three years ago, before I really knew much. Later I sold that gun and I have since acquired reproductions of the 1853 Enfield, and 1861 and 1863 Springfields. I eventually also found two originals, an 1853 Enfield and an 1861 Springfield. I fully intended to shoot everything that I have bought, although I don't think I'll be shooting the original Enfield, and my original Springfield still needs a new nipple before I can shoot it.

Originally, I hadn't intended to buy revolvers but the muskets were too heavy for my wife to hold and I thought she would do better with a revolver. I bought an Uberti 1861 Navy that she did get to shoot a couple of times before she died. And once I started shooting it more often, I became more interested in also acquiring revolvers such as those my ancestors might have had. That interest morphed into a desire to have the full range of Colt revolvers that were used by US troops in the ACW. I haven’t yet seriously looked for originals, and I buy reproductions with the intent to shoot them. So, in the attached photo, you can see (from top to bottom):

1. Uberti 1847 Walker. I can't find a date stamp on this revolver and the guy I purchased it from is still looking for the cap-and-ball cylinder. In the mean time I've shot it with the .44 long Colt conversion cylinder - lots of fun!
2. Uberti 1851 3rd Model Dragoon. I can't find a date stamp on this gun, either.
3. Colt 2nd generation 1851 Navy. 1974 date of manufacture.
4. Euroarms 1860 Army. Date proof mark = AA (1975).
5. Uberti 1861 Navy. Date proof mark = 2018. I bought this for my wife.
6. And just for fun, I’m showing y'all my North American Arms 22 LR (.22 long rifle) date unknown, but about 1990. (I want to get the NAA Companion, a .22 cap-and-ball revolver the same size as this one.)

I am not too interested in the “police” model Colts or in Remington revolvers, and I haven’t yet found a Paterson reproduction that is in my price range, but one day…

Offline Captainkirk

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Re: Evolution of the (Colt) Revolver
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2020, 11:20:10 AM »
Nice little family you got going on there, Kim!
"You gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"

Offline Kim Hyatt

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Re: Evolution of the (Colt) Revolver
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2020, 12:53:53 PM »
Thanks, Captain! If only they could reproduce...

Offline sourdough

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Re: Evolution of the (Colt) Revolver
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2020, 06:25:31 PM »
Very nice lineup, Kim!

When you get done with your Yankee revolver collection (which will be soon), you need to start a Reb collection that is based upon Colt 1851 Navy revolver "types": Schneider & Glassick, Griswold & Gunnison, Leech & Rigdon, Rigdon & Ansley, Augusta Machine Works, Columbus Fire Arms Manufacturing Company, J.H. Dance & Brothers, Tucker Sherrod and Company, George Todd, and L.E. Tucker & Sons.

You will have to become a Pietta parts-changer (such as I am) in order to engage in this next addiction. Make sure your bank account is full.

Due to the current pandemic, donor revolvers are hard to come by, and I perceive it will become worse as this goes on.

You can do this Leech & Rigdon with a Pietta 1851 Navy .36 as a donor revolver and parts from VTI (and maybe better wood from an Ebay seller).

Regards,

Jim





« Last Edit: November 04, 2020, 06:27:04 PM by sourdough »

Offline Long Johns Wolf

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Re: Evolution of the (Colt) Revolver
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2020, 02:01:16 AM »
Yeeehaw, sounds like a good plan.
Long Johns Wolf

Offline Kim Hyatt

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Re: Evolution of the (Colt) Revolver
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2020, 06:20:37 PM »
Confederate arms? Well, maybe... In the meantime I have another project in mind for which I also need a 51 Navy, definitely in 36 caliber, not 44. I've been trying to find one in the usual web places but alas, nothing's available so far. If anyone wants to part with a project gun, Pietta, Uberti, or something else, let me know!


Offline Kim Hyatt

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Re: Evolution of the (Colt) Revolver
« Reply #7 on: December 27, 2020, 04:40:45 PM »
Here's an update to my collection, including the North American Arms BP .22 that I finally picked up, just for fun. The reproductions range in date from the Replica Arms import .31 pocket revolver, 1963, sixth from top, to the Pietta 1860 Army that I just picked up for myself for Christmas. (No one else was going to give me anything, so...) The 1860 Army and shoulder stock were manufactured by Armi San Paolo, 1977. BTW, take a look at the date code on the new Pietta!

I know there are other reproductions I might buy to fill out the collection, but I never intended to find everything that was available from Colt, just representative examples of the most well known, most common, or that might have found their way onto an ACW battlefield. I would still like to find a Paterson and a sidehammer Root but they are hard to find, as no doubt y'all know. So if anyone wants to part with either, just let me know.  ;D

Offline Kim Hyatt

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Re: Evolution of the (Colt) Revolver
« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2020, 05:05:24 PM »
I forgot to add a neat little tidbit: the Replica Arms import is serial number 8. Anyone know who the manufacturer might have been?

Offline sourdough

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Re: Evolution of the (Colt) Revolver
« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2020, 06:59:38 AM »
ASM, date code XIX. One can always identify ASM Pockets by the sloping trigger guard shoulders.

I used to own the top revolver with the same date code, Replica Arms El Paso Texas.



Here's another RA, but Marietta Ohio.



Jim
« Last Edit: December 28, 2020, 07:00:12 AM by sourdough »

Offline Kim Hyatt

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Re: Evolution of the (Colt) Revolver
« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2020, 09:44:36 AM »
Thanks for clearing that up Jim.

Offline ShotgunDave

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Re: Evolution of the (Colt) Revolver
« Reply #11 on: December 29, 2020, 01:49:06 PM »
You've amassed a nice little collection there Kim.

I'm with you. One day I hope to have a Paterson and a Root. I'd also like a Colt sidehammer rifle. All hard to find, and expensive.
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Offline Kim Hyatt

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Re: Evolution of the (Colt) Revolver
« Reply #12 on: December 30, 2020, 12:00:26 AM »
Thanks Dave. I have hopes of finding a repop Paterson - one day - but a Root repop? I understand some were made but I haven’t seen any come up for sale in any of the usual places. I may end up saving my nickels for the real deal. I’ve seen some that I might be able to afford. Now the side hammer rifles are a different story. I don’t think I’ve seen one for less than five figures. Has anyone ever made reproductions?

Offline ShotgunDave

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Re: Evolution of the (Colt) Revolver
« Reply #13 on: December 30, 2020, 09:34:04 AM »
I'm with ya. The Paterson isn't too hard to find, they're just expensive. The Root is expensive AND hard to find. Palmetto made them, but are now out of business. So they don't come up for sale very often. I've looked at originals as well. They're actually not that expensive for a shooter grade gun.

As for the rifle, they are rare as hens teeth. They were also made by Palmetto if I'm not mistaken. But they were made it much smaller quantities and are really hard to find. There was a guy on another board that had one he was "thinking" about selling. He was just testing the waters so to speak. He wanted $5000 for it. Way too rich for my blood.
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Offline Kim Hyatt

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Re: Evolution of the (Colt) Revolver
« Reply #14 on: December 30, 2020, 04:52:28 PM »
I think what else I could buy for $5000. That would get a nice original revolver maybe even a Spencer rifle (also on my wish list).